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Today’s debate topic: Is having a robot that can fetch you a beer from the fridge worth the risk of sparking a possible robot uprising?

vintage-robots:

Meet H.E.N.R.Y (by Bruce Taylor) the “Most Entertaining” robot of the International Personal Robot Congress & Exposition, 1984.

With a mere 16K of memory H.E.N.R.Y. possessed a 128-word spoken vocabulary plus voice recognition capabilities.

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If the Robots Kill Us, It's Because It's Their Job

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These are vinyl toys created by Steve Talkowski for the “March of the Robots” daily sketch challenge and Kickstarter campaign, but they could be snapshots from an adorable robopocalyptic hellscape that awaits us. You can follow more of his work @ sketchbot on Tumblr. 

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Robots for different nations by Dusan Pavlic

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Users are People/People are Human
by John H. Ratajczak
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Now wondering if distortion and reverb can make a robot more dangerous thanks to these awesome concept pieces by Marcos Cabrera

 |  165 notes  |  vintage-robots

vintage-robots:

Perhaps the most advanced personal robot from the 1980s, Newton could accept voice commands, answer the phone, and was wirelessly connected to online data bases.

If it wasn’t missing killrays, this might have become our new robot overlord.

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These inspired pieces from UK artist Nick Hamilton are fun and whimsical but don’t really make me feel any better about the impending robot uprising. He has these prints for sale if you are so moved. 

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gameraboy:

Modern Inventions (1937)

The future that awaits us. 

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If you suffer from a fear of robots and entomophobia like I do, then these clockwork bugs and spiders from artist Mike Libby take creepy to a whole new level. Otherwise, you can enjoy more of his work at the Insect Lab